15-Day Iceland & North Cape Quest

24 Day Cruise from £4,298 pp  

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Seabourn 24 Day Cruise on Seabourn Quest, Seabourn from £4,298 pp  

Departure 01 June 2019 | 15-Day Iceland & North Cape Quest

Fares are cruise-only unless otherwise stated. Contact us to add flights and tailor-make your holiday.

Destinations

  • Reykjavík
  • Akureyri
  • Siglufjørdur - Høfn
  • Isafjørdur
  • At Sea
  • Tromsø
  • Hammerfest
  • Harstad
  • Brønnøysund
  • Honningsvåg
  • Stavanger
  • Arendal
  • Aalborg
  • Copenhagen

15-Day Iceland & North Cape Quest

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Day by day itinerary

Day 1 — Reykjavík
Blue Lagoon, Reykjavik, Iceland

Blue Lagoon, Reykjavik, Iceland

Sprawling Reykjavík, the nation's nerve center and government seat, is home to half the island's population. On a bay overlooked by proud Mt. Esja (pronounced eh-shyuh), with its ever-changing hues, Reykjavík presents a colorful sight, its concrete houses painted in light colors and topped by vibrant red, blue, and green roofs. In contrast to the almost treeless countryside, Reykjavík has many tall, native birches, rowans, and willows, as well as imported aspen, pines, and spruces.Reykjavík's name comes from the Icelandic words for smoke, reykur, and bay, vík. In AD 874, Norseman Ingólfur Arnarson saw Iceland rising out of the misty sea and came ashore at a bay eerily shrouded with plumes of steam from nearby hot springs. Today most of the houses in Reykjavík are heated by near-boiling water from the hot springs. Natural heating avoids air pollution; there's no smoke around. You may notice, however, that the hot water brings a slight sulfur smell to the bathroom.Prices are easily on a par with other major European cities. A practical option is to purchase a Reykjavík City Card at the Tourist Information Center or at the Reykjavík Youth Hostel. This card permits unlimited bus usage and admission to any of the city's seven pools, the Family Park and Zoo, and city museums. The cards are valid for one (ISK 3,300), two (ISK 4,400), or three days (ISK 4,900), and they pay for themselves after three or four uses a day. Even lacking the City Card, paying admission (ISK 500, or ISK 250 for seniors and people with disabilities) to one of the city art museums (Hafnarhús, Kjarvalsstaðir, or Ásmundarsafn) gets you free same-day admission to the other two.
Day 2 — Akureyri
Godafoss Waterfall near Akureyri, Iceland

Godafoss Waterfall near Akureyri, Iceland

Akureyri, called the Capital of the North is the second largest urban area in Iceland, and a lively one at that. Hemmed by the 60-km (37-mile) long Eyjafjörður, Akureyri is sheltered from the ocean winds and embraced by mountains on three sides. Late 19th-century wooden houses impart a sense of history, and the twin spires of a modern Lutheran church rising on a green hill near the waterfront, provide a focal point. To the south of Akureyri is the pyramid-shape rhyolite mountain Súlur. Beyond it is Kerling, the highest peak in Eyjafjörður District.
Day 3 — Siglufjørdur - Høfn
Day 4 to 5 — Isafjørdur
Two colossal terraces of sheer rock stand either side of this extraordinarily located town - which rides a jutting spit onto an immensity of black fjord water. Surprisingly, considering the remoteness of its location and its compact size, Isafjordur is a modern and lively place to visit, offering a great choice of cafes and delicious restaurants – which are well stocked to impress visitors. The town is a perfectly located base for adventures amongst Iceland's fantastic wilderness - with skiing, hiking and water-sports popular pursuits among visitors.
Day 6 — At Sea
Day 7 to 10 — Tromsø
With its centre located on the island of Tromsø, the municipality of Tromsø is more than five times the size of Norway’s capital, Oslo, and is the world’s northernmost university city. Lying 200 miles inside the Arctic Circle, it is known as the 'Gateway to the Arctic' because it was used as a starting point for hunters looking for Arctic foxes, polar bears and seals. In the 19th century it was a base for explorers on Arctic expeditions – a history that is remembered in the city’s Polar Museum, which you can visit on an excursion. Also commemorated in the area is the history of Norway’s indigenous people, the Sami. Visitors can learn about the traditions, heritage and modern preservation of the Sami culture at the Tromsø Museum. Nowadays, Tromsø is a charming mix of old and new, with wooden buildings sitting alongside contemporary architecture such as the impressive glacier-like Arctic Cathedral, which features one of the largest stained glass windows in Europe. Looking down on the city is Mount Storsteinen, and a cable car runs to the top, giving wonderful views over the surrounding countryside of forested peaks and reindeer pastures.
Day 11 — Hammerfest
Hammerfest City, Finnmark, Norway

Hammerfest City, Finnmark, Norway

More than 600 miles north of the Arctic Circle, the world's northernmost town is also one of the most widely visited and oldest places in northern Norway. "Hammerfest" means "mooring place" and refers to the natural harbor (remarkably free of ice year-round thanks to the Gulf Stream) that is formed by the crags in the mountain. Hammerfest is the gateway to the Barents Sea and the Arctic Ocean, a jumping-off point for Arctic expeditions. Once a hunting town, Hammerfest's town emblem features the polar bear. In 1891 the residents of Hammerfest, tired of the months of darkness that winter always brought, decided to brighten their nights: they purchased a generator from Thomas Edison, and Hammerfest thus ecame the first city in Europe to have electric street lamps. In addition to two museums, there are several shops within Hammerfest's small city center. There is also a market selling souvenirs and other goods outside the town hall.
Day 12 — Harstad
Day 13 — Brønnøysund
Sitting just below the Arctic Circle, a visit to Bronnoysund guarantees a journey of culture and extraordinary scenery. Bronnoysund is quintessential Norway, and encompasses everything you'd expect from this stunning country - along with plenty of surprises along the way. Raking fjords, scattered islands, and roaring rivers provide a huge natural bounty - but it’s the Torghatten Mountain that’s Bronnoysund’s true crowning glory. Torghatten Mountain rises like a colossal castle of sheer granite, and is particularly striking because it’s punctured right through the centre by a giant hole. Line up the view just right, and you can see sunlight bursting through the hole, as if illuminated by a massive spotlight. It's hard to imagine how such a striking phenomenon would form naturally, and indeed the local folklore has a persuasive explanation – that it was created when an arrow ripped through the troll king's hat, which was thrown into the air to protect a fleeing girl. The hat turned to stone, and the arrow’s hole is preserved there to this day. If you care to climb Torghatten Mountain, you can walk through its cavernous interior, to look down over the red wooden barns and glistening lakes below.
Day 14 to 16 — Honningsvåg
Harbour at Honningsvåg, Norway

Harbour at Honningsvåg, Norway

Searching in 1553 for a northeast passage to India, British navigator Richard Chancellor came upon a crag 307 yards above the Barents Sea. He named the jut of rock North Cape, or Nordkapp. Today Europe's northernmost point is a rite-of-passage journey for nearly all Scandinavians and many others. Most cruise passengers visit Nordkapp from Honningsvåg, a fishing village on Magerøya Island. The journey from Honningsvåg to Nordkapp covers about 35 km (22 miles) across a landscape characterized by rocky tundra and grazing reindeer, which are rounded up each spring by Sami herdsmen in boats. The herdsmen herd the reindeer across a mile-wide channel from their winter home on the mainland. Honningvåg's northerly location makes for long, dark winter nights and perpetually sun-filled summer days. The village serves as the gateway to Arctic exploration and the beautiful Nordkapp Plateau, a destination that calls to all visitors of this region. Most of those who journey to Nordkapp (North Cape), the northernmost tip of Europe, are in it for a taste of this unique, otherworldly, rugged yet delicate landscape. You'll see an incredible treeless tundra, with crumbling mountains and sparse dwarf plants. The subarctic environment is very vulnerable, so don't disturb the plants. Walk only on marked trails and don't remove stones, leave car marks, or make campfires. Because the roads are closed in winter, the only access is from the tiny fishing village of Skarsvåg via Sno-Cat, a thump-and-bump ride that's as unforgettable as the desolate view.
Day 17 to 21 — Stavanger
17th Century Buildings That Front The Harbor, Stavanger, Norway

17th Century Buildings That Front The Harbor, Stavanger, Norway

Overlooking the Atlantic Ocean, Stavanger flourished in the 19th century as a fishing port. While other towns in Norway have suffered with the decline of this industry, Stavanger has kept its economy booming by diversifying, first into shipbuilding and now into oil. These two contrasting industries have created a city of two halves – a modern area of high-rise buildings and a historic centre with cobbled streets and old wooden houses. The city centre was the birthplace of Alexander Kielland, one of the great 19th-century Norwegian novelists. Stavanger Cathedral, dating from 1125, is an impressive building and the only medieval cathedral in Norway that has not been substantially altered since it was first built. From Stavanger you can explore the attractive blue waters of Lysefjord, surrounded by cliffs and striking rock formations, and also visit Hafrsfjord where the Viking King Harald won an important battle that started the Unification of Norway. Those preferring to explore on their own may wish to visit the interesting Petroleum Museum.
Day 22 — Arendal
You’ll weave between glowing lighthouses and picturesque islands, as you approach the quaint Norwegian town of Arendal. Set on the southern coast, and spanning seven islands, Arendal is a place to slow the pace, and unwind surrounded by Norway’s easy-going beauty. Ferries – and boat hiring opportunities - make exploring easy, or you can get out on foot or two wheels to throw yourself into the thick of the area’s outstanding natural beauty. Arendal's twin lighthouses are the first thing you'll see, as your ship leaves the open ocean, and heads to Arendal itself. The perfect focal point for any photo, Store Torungen is still in working order - witness it flashing its warnings to passing ships, as they navigate the tricky islands and skerries that are scattered across the waters. Cafes and shell-fish sellers welcome you to the city centre as you step off the ship, and you’re immediately well placed to slow the pace, and wander beside glistening water. Or, why not stretch your legs by escaping to the countryside and cycling along wooden pathways that skirt glistening lakes?
Day 23 — Aalborg
Day 24 — Copenhagen
The Little Mermaid, Copenhagen, Denmark

The Little Mermaid, Copenhagen, Denmark

By the 11th century, Copenhagen was already an important trading and fishing centre and today you will find an attractive city which, although the largest in Scandinavia, has managed to retain its low-level skyline. Discover some of the famous attractions including Gefion Fountain and Amalienborg Palace, perhaps cruise the city’s waterways, visit Rosenborg Castle or explore the medieval fishing village of Dragoer. Once the home of Hans Christian Andersen, Copenhagen features many reminders of its fairytale heritage and lives up to the reputation immortalised in the famous song ‘Wonderful Copenhagen’.

Sailing on Seabourn Quest

Seabourn Quest, the newest ship to be added to the renowned Yachts of Seabourn luxury cruise fleet. Seabourn Quest is due to make it first voyage in Summer 2011.

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Included as standard...

  • 1 year complimentary Priority Pass membership
  • Complimentary airport lounge access *
  • Welcome Home Gift

* fly-cruise only

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