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14-Day Gems Of Northern Europe

15 Day Cruise from £5,199 pp  

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Seabourn 15 Day Cruise on Seabourn Ovation, Seabourn from £5,199 pp  

Departure 31 August 2019 | 14-Day Gems Of Northern Europe

Fares are cruise-only unless otherwise stated. Contact us to add flights and tailor-make your holiday.

Destinations

  • Copenhagen
  • Fredericia
  • Oslo
  • Fredrikstad
  • Helsingør
  • Warnemünde
  • Travemünde
  • At Sea
  • Rotterdam
  • Antwerp
  • At Sea
  • Dunmore East
  • Dublin

14-Day Gems Of Northern Europe

from £5,199 pp
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Day by day itinerary

Day 1 — Copenhagen
Nyhavn, Copenhagen

Nyhavn, Copenhagen

By the 11th century, Copenhagen was already an important trading and fishing centre and today you will find an attractive city which, although the largest in Scandinavia, has managed to retain its low-level skyline. Discover some of the famous attractions including Gefion Fountain and Amalienborg Palace, perhaps cruise the city’s waterways, visit Rosenborg Castle or explore the medieval fishing village of Dragoer. Once the home of Hans Christian Andersen, Copenhagen features many reminders of its fairytale heritage and lives up to the reputation immortalised in the famous song ‘Wonderful Copenhagen’.
Day 2 — Fredericia
A warm welcome by locals can always be expected at this Danish port, and after a short stroll on the beach, a dip in the sea, and a bicycle ride around the city’s historic old town and fortress why not travel the 37 miles/60 kilometres to Odense to the birthplace of Denmark’s great children’s author, Hans Christian Andersen. Visit Andersen’s childhood home to (re)discover the works of this emblematic writer. The adjacent museum is particularly interesting as it allows a full exploration of Andersen’s creative talents and gives an idea of his enormous imagination – which was not just limited to the fairy tales that are so loved by children the world over. Do look out for the paper cuttings, which are superb in their delicacy and handling.
Day 3 to 4 — Oslo
Akershus Fortress, Oslo

Akershus Fortress, Oslo

Oslo is the capital of Norway and is also its largest city, situated at the head of Oslo Fjord and surrounded by hills and forests. Home to some 50 museums and full of galleries, cafés, a sculpture park and the Royal Palace, this vibrant city with its handsome 19th-century buildings and wide streets has much to offer. Its history dates back 1,000 years, and includes a rich seafaring heritage that ranges from the Viking era to Thor Heyerdahl’s Kon Tiki expedition. Discover more about this exciting city on our varied selection of excursions.
Day 5 — Fredrikstad
Day 6 — Helsingør
Day 7 — Warnemünde
Warnemunde with beach chairs and Lighthouse, Germany

Warnemunde with beach chairs and Lighthouse, Germany

Warnemünde, officially a suburb of Rostock, is a quaint seaside resort town with the best hotels and restaurants in the area, as well as 20 km (12 miles) of beautiful white-sand beach. It's been a popular summer getaway for families in eastern Germany for years.There is little to do in Warnemünde except relax, and the town excels brilliantly at that. However, Warnemünde is a major cruise-ship terminal. Whenever there is more than one ship at dock, the town explodes with a county fair–like atmosphere, and shops and restaurants stay open until the ships leave at midnight. The city celebrates the dreifache Anlauf, when three ships dock simultaneously, with fireworks.
Day 8 — Travemünde
Travemünde is a beach resort with history: The town was founded in 1187 by Count Adolf III zu Schauenburg, who recognized the strategic value of its site at junction of the River Trave and the Baltic Sea. In 1329, Lübeck bought the village and its castle, thereby securing access to the Baltic for international trade. Fishing was the village's main source of income until the late 18th Century, when tourism entered the picture. Throughout the 50s and 60s, Travermunde was to Germany, what St. Tropez was to France. Even though that is perhaps not the case anymore (you’ll see no megayachts or Russian billions here), Travermunde has retained a very charming and inviting olde-worlde appeal of beach huts, boats and barbeques. A long river of sand greets the happy traveller who disembarks here and if the gentle Baltic sea and distinctive – and very comfortable – wicker strandkörbe (hooded beach seats), are not enough to keep you busy, then exploring the attractive riverfront is a worthwhile pastime. The stroll into town provides the perfect excuse to sample some of the excellent many draft beers on tap and for these feeling a bit peckish, the fish restaurants are reputed to be some of the best in the country. Do not miss a chance to taste the local speciality of young herring served with salad and salted, boiled potatoes that have been rolled in cumin. To work off your feast, then the short hike or cycle ride (bike hire shops are found almost everywhere) to the conservation area around Brodtener Steilufer is well worthwhile, and commands spectacular views.
Day 9 to 10 — At Sea
Day 11 — Rotterdam
Rotterdam. Cityscape image of Rotterdam, Netherlands

Rotterdam. Cityscape image of Rotterdam, Netherlands

Rotterdam is a city that's a long way removed from most people's stereotypical notion of the Netherlands. There are few, if any, canals to be found here nor are there any quaint windmills. There is, however, a thriving modern city which is one of the busiest ports in the entire world.
Day 12 — Antwerp
View over Antwerp with cathedral of our lady taken, Belgium

View over Antwerp with cathedral of our lady taken, Belgium

Explore Antwerp, Belgium's second city. Known for its diamond cutting industry, fashion and the many great artists that lived in its vicinity, Antwerp is a city focused on art and culture.
Day 13 — At Sea
Day 14 — Dunmore East
Day 15 — Dublin
Ha'penny Bridge, Dublin, Ireland

Ha'penny Bridge, Dublin, Ireland

Dublin is making a comeback. The decade-long "Celtic Tiger" boom era was quickly followed by the Great Recession, but The Recovery has finally taken a precarious hold. For visitors, this newer and wiser Dublin has become one of western Europe's most popular and delightful urban destinations. Whether or not you're out to enjoy the old or new Dublin, you'll find it a colossally entertaining city, all the more astonishing considering its intimate size.It is ironic and telling that James Joyce chose Dublin as the setting for his famous Ulysses, Dubliners, and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man because it was a "center of paralysis" where nothing much ever changed. Which only proves that even the greats get it wrong sometimes. Indeed, if Joyce were to return to his once-genteel hometown today—disappointed with the city's provincial outlook, he left it in 1902 at the age of 20—and take a quasi-Homeric odyssey through the city (as he so famously does in Ulysses), would he even recognize Dublin as his "Dear Dirty Dumpling, foostherfather of fingalls and dotthergills"?For instance, what would he make of Temple Bar—the city's erstwhile down-at-the-heels neighborhood, now crammed with cafés and trendy hotels and suffused with a nonstop, international-party atmosphere? Or the simple sophistication of the open-air restaurants of the tiny Italian Quarter (named Quartier Bloom after his own creation), complete with sultry tango lessons? Or of the hot–cool Irishness, where every aspect of Celtic culture results in sold-out theaters, from Once, the cult indie movie and Broadway hit, to Riverdance, the old Irish mass-jig recast as a Las Vegas extravaganza? Plus, the resurrected Joyce might be stirred by the songs of Hozier, fired up by the sultry acting of Michael Fassbender, and moved by the award-winning novels of Colum McCann. As for Ireland's capital, it's packed with elegant shops and hotels, theaters, galleries, coffeehouses, and a stunning variety of new, creative little restaurants can be found on almost every street in Dublin, transforming the provincial city that suffocated Joyce into a place almost as cosmopolitan as the Paris to which he fled. And the locals are a hell of a lot more fun! Now that the economy has finally turned a corner, Dublin citizens can cast a cool eye over the last 20 crazy years. Some argue that the boomtown transformation of their heretofore-tranquil city has permanently affected its spirit and character. These skeptics (skepticism long being a favorite pastime in the capital city) await the outcome of "Dublin: The Sequel," and their greatest fear is the possibility that the tattered old lady on the Liffey has become a little less unique, a little more like everywhere else.Oh ye of little faith: the rare ole gem that is Dublin is far from buried. The fundamentals—the Georgian elegance of Merrion Square, the Norman drama of Christ Church Cathedral, the foamy pint at an atmospheric pub—are still on hand to gratify. Most of all, there are the locals themselves: the nod and grin when you catch their eye on the street, the eagerness to hear half your life story before they tell you all of theirs, and their paradoxically dark but warm sense of humor. It's expected that 2016 will be an extra-special year in the capital, as centenary celebrations of the fateful 1916 Easter Rising will dominate much of the cultural calendar.

Sailing on Seabourn Ovation

Seabourn Ovation will expand and build upon the line's award-winning and highly acclaimed Odyssey-class ships.

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