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30-Day World Cruise: Polynesian Pathways

31 Day Cruise from £27,999 pp  

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Seabourn 31 Day Cruise on Seabourn Sojourn, Seabourn from £27,999 pp  

Departure 29 April 2020 | 30-Day World Cruise: Polynesian Pathways

Fares are cruise-only unless otherwise stated. Contact us to add flights and tailor-make your holiday.

Destinations

  • Auckland
  • Russel
  • At Sea
  • Nouméa
  • Kuto Bay
  • At Sea
  • Suva
  • Savusavu
  • At Sea
  • Apia
  • Pago Pago
  • At Sea
  • Fanning Islands
  • At Sea
  • Kailua-Kona
  • Honolulu
  • Lanai Island
  • At Sea
  • San Francisco

30-Day World Cruise: Polynesian Pathways

from £27,999 pp
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Day by day itinerary

Day 1 — Auckland
Auckland skyline with harbor, New Zealand

Auckland skyline with harbor, New Zealand

Auckland is called the City of Sails, and visitors flying in will see why. On the East Coast is the Waitemata Harbour—a Māori word meaning sparkling waters—which is bordered by the Hauraki Gulf, an aquatic playground peppered with small islands where many Aucklanders can be found "mucking around in boats."Not surprisingly, Auckland has some 70,000 boats. About one in four households in Auckland has a seacraft of some kind, and there are 102 beaches within an hour's drive; during the week many are quite empty. Even the airport is by the water; it borders the Manukau Harbour, which also takes its name from the Māori language and means solitary bird.According to Māori tradition, the Auckland isthmus was originally peopled by a race of giants and fairy folk. When Europeans arrived in the early 19th century, however, the Ngāti-Whātua tribe was firmly in control of the region. The British began negotiations with the Ngāti-Whātua in 1840 to purchase the isthmus and establish the colony's first capital. In September of that year the British flag was hoisted to mark the township's foundation, and Auckland remained the capital until 1865, when the seat of government was moved to Wellington. Aucklanders expected to suffer from the shift; it hurt their pride but not their pockets. As the terminal for the South Sea shipping routes, Auckland was already an established commercial center. Since then the urban sprawl has made this city of approximately 1.3 million people one of the world's largest geographically.A couple of days in the city will reveal just how developed and sophisticated Auckland is—the Mercer City Survey 2012 saw it ranked as the third-highest city for quality of life—though those seeking a New York in the South Pacific will be disappointed. Auckland is more get-up and go-outside than get-dressed-up and go-out. That said, most shops are open daily, central bars and a few nightclubs buzz well into the wee hours, especially Thursday through Saturday, and a mix of Māori, Pacific people, Asians, and Europeans contributes to the cultural milieu. Auckland has the world's largest single population of Pacific Islanders living outside their home countries, though many of them live outside the central parts of the city and in Manukau to the south. The Samoan language is the second most spoken in New Zealand. Most Pacific people came to New Zealand seeking a better life. When the plentiful, low-skilled work that attracted them dried up, the dream soured, and the population has suffered with poor health and education. Luckily, policies are now addressing that, and change is slowly coming. The Pacifica Festival in March is the region's biggest cultural event, attracting thousands to Western Springs. The annual Pacific Island Secondary Schools’ Competition, also in March, sees young Pacific Islander and Asian students compete in traditional dance, drumming, and singing. This event is open to the public.At the geographical center of Auckland city is the 1,082-foot Sky Tower, a convenient landmark for those exploring on foot and some say a visible sign of the city's naked aspiration. It has earned nicknames like the Needle and the Big Penis—a counterpoint to a poem by acclaimed New Zealand poet James K. Baxter, which refers to Rangitoto Island as a clitoris in the harbor.The Waitemata Harbour has become better known since New Zealand staged its first defense of the America's Cup in 2000 and the successful Louis Vuitton Pacific Series in early 2009. The first regatta saw major redevelopment of the waterfront. The area, where many of the city's most popular bars, cafés, and restaurants are located, is now known as Viaduct Basin or, more commonly, the Viaduct. A recent expansion has created another area, Wynyard Quarter, which is slowly adding restaurants.These days, Auckland is still considered too bold and brash for its own good by many Kiwis who live "south of the Bombay Hills," the geographical divide between Auckland and the rest of New Zealand (barring Northland). "Jafa," an acronym for "just another f—ing Aucklander," has entered the local lexicon; there's even a book out called Way of the Jafa: A Guide to Surviving Auckland and Aucklanders. A common complaint is that Auckland absorbs the wealth from the hard work of the rest of the country. Most Aucklanders, on the other hand, still try to shrug and see it as the parochial envy of those who live in small towns. But these internal identity squabbles aren't your problem. You can enjoy a well-made coffee in almost any café, or take a walk on a beach—knowing that within 30 minutes' driving time you could be cruising the spectacular harbor, playing a round at a public golf course, or even walking in subtropical forest while listening to the song of a native tûî bird.
Day 2 — Russel
Day 3 to 4 — At Sea
Day 5 — Nouméa
View of a beach at Noumea, New Caledonia during sunset

View of a beach at Noumea, New Caledonia during sunset

With its elegant urban infrastructure in a stunning natural setting, Noumea is a truly unique island and part of the New Caledonia archipelago. Noumea started as a penal colony, but has since evolved to a lovely metropolis and today has almost two thirds of New Caledonia’s population. While much of the archipelago of New Caledonia has a large percentage of Kanak people – the indigenous inhabitants who live in tribal areas across the country – Noumea is predominantly European with a strong French influence. The city’s center and Place de Cocotiers, the main park, are located close to the harbor and several churches date back to the late 19th century. Other attractions include a world-class aquarium at Anse Vata, several long beaches to the south, and a noteworthy collection of Kanak and South Pacific objects at the Museum of New Caledonia. The architectural gem of the city is the Tjibaou Cultural Center, the structure of which resembles sails, or the roofs of Kanak houses hidden behind mangroves.
Day 6 — Kuto Bay, Isle Des Pins
Named by Captain Cook in the 18th century for its prominent, spiny pine trees, Île des Pins is a vibrantly beautiful island located in the Pacific Ocean and part of the New Caledonia archipelago. Surrounded by some of the world’s brightest aquamarine blue water, the island has also been nicknamed as “the closest island to paradise,” with tropical fish and coral that can be seen through the transparent waters of its lagoon. Île des Pins was used in the 19th century as a prison for political exiles from France and remains can still be seen at Kuto and in the village of Ouro. Today the island’s primary inhabitants of the island are the native Melanesian Kanaks, with 2,000 residents. One of the local sites to see on this island are the spear-shaped carvings surrounding a Catholic monument in the city of Kuto. The beaches in Kuto and close-by Kanumera are some of the finest beaches in the South Pacific and while Kuto is for swimming, Kanumera and the giant rock in its bay are for snorkelling.
Day 7 to 8 — At Sea
Day 9 to 10 — Suva
Cathedral in Suva

Cathedral in Suva

Fiji is a collection of tropical islands in the South Pacific and is well known for soft coral diving, white sandy beaches, and idyllic and peaceful surroundings. Because of its paradisiac surroundings, Fiji is a popular location for weddings and honeymoons. Suva is the capital of the Fiji archipelago, located on the southeastern coast of the island of Viti Levu and is the second most populated city of Fiji.
Day 11 — Savusavu
Suva, a multiracial city, is the pulsing heart of the South Pacific. Its location is on a hilly peninsula in the southeast corner of Viti Levu Island, the largest in the Fijian archipelago. Suva was named the country's capital in 1882; the former capital was Luvuka. Suva's natural harbour was no doubt a deciding factor that prompted the change. Its port is the country's main shipping facility, accommodating vessels from all over the world. The town is backed by the lush green hills of the Suva-Rewa range. The waterfront district, much of which is built on land reclaimed from tangled mangrove swamps, provides the hub for much of Suva's activities. The downtown centre is a hodgepodge of high-rise office buildings, colonial houses with second-story verandas, parks and government structures. The northern and western mountains catch the trade winds, with the result being damp conditions year-round and frequent tropical downpours. Despite the ever-present possibility of showers, Suva is an excellent place to explore on foot. Many points of interest are located on Victoria Parade and along tree-shaded Queen Elizabeth Drive. Suva's botanical park is lush with flowering plants, trees and green lawns. In its centre stands the Fiji Museum, where objects reflect 3,000 years of Fijian history. The museum boasts a fine collection of Melanesian artefacts and various exhibits that reflect on Fiji's maritime era. Government House stands on a hillside surrounded by landscaped grounds. A stern, uniformed sentry guards the pillared gate entrance. The monthly Changing of the Guard is executed with almost as much pomp and ceremony as at London's Buckingham Palace. Friendly Fiji will charm you; here Melanesia mixes with Polynesia, ancient India with Oceania and tradition with the modern world. The Fijian greeting "Bula!" is extended warmly to strangers on city streets and country roads. Fiji is one of the South Pacific's most hospitable countries and a holiday destination that has much to offer in recreational activities, shopping and joyous celebrations.
Day 12 — At Sea
Day 13 — Apia
Apia, Samoa. Hut and boat by the beach

Apia, Samoa. Hut and boat by the beach

Samoa is a group of ten islands located in the South Pacific. The tropical climate and volcanic landscape create a picturesque location for visitors to explore, together with the experience of Fa'a Samoa, the three thousand year old way of life on Samoa.
Day 14 — Pago Pago
American Samoa is a tropical paradise, located in the Pacific Ocean and home to some of the world's most unique flora and fauna. Pago Pago is the main harbour and village of Tutuila island. It is considered the capital of the territory and is the entry point for visitors exploring the picturesque volcanic islands.
Day 15 to 17 — At Sea
Day 18 — Fanning Islands
Day 19 to 20 — At Sea
Day 21 — Kailua-Kona, Hawaii
Day 22 to 23 — Honolulu, Hawaii
Diamond Head and Waikiki Beach, Honolulu city, Hawaii

Diamond Head and Waikiki Beach, Honolulu city, Hawaii

Capital of Hawaii, and a popular tourist destination, Honolulu is known for surfing and water sports. However, there's more to the city than surfing; with museums, the only royal palace in the country, and a mall, there's bound to be something of interest for any visitor.
Day 24 — Lanai Island, Hawaii
Day 25 to 29 — At Sea
Day 30 to 31 — San Francisco, California
With its myriad hills and spectacular bay, San Francisco beguiles with natural beauty, vibrant neighborhoods, and contagious energy. From the hipster Mission District to the sassy Castro, from bustling Union Square to enduring Chinatown, this dynamic town thrives on variety. The city makes it wonderfully easy to tap into the good life, too: between San Francisco's hot arts scene, tempting boutiques, parks perfect for jogging or biking, and all those stellar locavore restaurants and cocktail bars, it's the ultimate destination for relaxed self-indulgence.

Sailing on Seabourn Sojourn

Seabourn Sojourn, which will debut next year, carries 450 guests in the same intimate, relaxed atmosphere as its smaller sister ships and shares the same all-suite accommodations and delights, such as the water sports marina.

See more about Seabourn Sojourn

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All of our cruise specialists are also global travel experts. They'll happily draw from their years of experience to combine your cruise with any number of pre- and post-cruise holiday options, creating a trip designed for you.

Included as standard...

  • 1 year complimentary Priority Pass membership
  • Complimentary airport lounge access *
  • Welcome Home Gift

* fly-cruise only

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