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San Juan To Fort Lauderdale, Florida

11 Day Cruise from £4,500 pp  

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Silversea 11 Day Cruise on Silver Wind, Silversea from £4,500 pp  

Departure 31 March 2019 | San Juan To Fort Lauderdale, Florida

Fares are cruise-only unless otherwise stated. Contact us to add flights and tailor-make your holiday.

Destinations

  • San Juan
  • At Sea
  • Santiago De Cuba
  • Georgetown
  • Cienfuegos
  • At Sea
  • Havana
  • Bimini Island
  • Fort Lauderdale

San Juan To Fort Lauderdale, Florida

from £4,500 pp
Cruise offer
Silver Privilege Fly Cruise Price (Economy Class) Special Offer
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Day by day itinerary

Day 1 — San Juan
If you associate Puerto Rico's capital with the colonial streets of Old San Juan, then you know only part of the picture. San Juan is a major metropolis, radiating out from the bay on the Atlantic Ocean that was discovered by Juan Ponce de León. More than a third of the island's nearly 4 million citizens proudly call themselves sanjuaneros. The city may be rooted in the past, but it has its eye on the future. Locals go about their business surrounded by colonial architecture and towering modern structures.By 1508 the explorer Juan Ponce de León had established a colony in an area now known as Caparra, southeast of present-day San Juan. He later moved the settlement north to a more hospitable peninsular location. In 1521, after he became the first colonial governor, Ponce de León switched the name of the island—which was then called San Juan Bautista in honor of St. John the Baptist—with that of the settlement of Puerto Rico ("rich port").Defended by the imposing Castillo San Felipe del Morro (El Morro) and Castillo San Cristóbal, Puerto Rico's administrative and population center remained firmly in Spain's hands until 1898, when it came under U.S. control after the Spanish-American War. Centuries of Spanish rule left an indelible imprint on the city, particularly in the walled area now known as Old San Juan. The area is filled with cobblestone streets and brightly painted, colonial-era structures, and its fortifications have been designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site.Old San Juan is a monument to the past, but most of the rest of the city is planted firmly in the 21st century and draws migrants island-wide and from farther afield to jobs in its businesses and industries. The city captivates residents and visitors alike with its vibrant lifestyle as well as its balmy beaches, pulsing nightclubs, globe-spanning restaurants, and world-class museums. Once you set foot in this city, you may never want to leave.
Day 2 — At Sea
If you associate Puerto Rico's capital with the colonial streets of Old San Juan, then you know only part of the picture. San Juan is a major metropolis, radiating out from the bay on the Atlantic Ocean that was discovered by Juan Ponce de León. More than a third of the island's nearly 4 million citizens proudly call themselves sanjuaneros. The city may be rooted in the past, but it has its eye on the future. Locals go about their business surrounded by colonial architecture and towering modern structures.By 1508 the explorer Juan Ponce de León had established a colony in an area now known as Caparra, southeast of present-day San Juan. He later moved the settlement north to a more hospitable peninsular location. In 1521, after he became the first colonial governor, Ponce de León switched the name of the island—which was then called San Juan Bautista in honor of St. John the Baptist—with that of the settlement of Puerto Rico ("rich port").Defended by the imposing Castillo San Felipe del Morro (El Morro) and Castillo San Cristóbal, Puerto Rico's administrative and population center remained firmly in Spain's hands until 1898, when it came under U.S. control after the Spanish-American War. Centuries of Spanish rule left an indelible imprint on the city, particularly in the walled area now known as Old San Juan. The area is filled with cobblestone streets and brightly painted, colonial-era structures, and its fortifications have been designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site.Old San Juan is a monument to the past, but most of the rest of the city is planted firmly in the 21st century and draws migrants island-wide and from farther afield to jobs in its businesses and industries. The city captivates residents and visitors alike with its vibrant lifestyle as well as its balmy beaches, pulsing nightclubs, globe-spanning restaurants, and world-class museums. Once you set foot in this city, you may never want to leave.
Day 3 to 4 — Santiago De Cuba
If ever a city could talk, then Santiago de Cuba would have a lot to say! With its revolutionary history and distinguishing Afro-Caribbean style, this is a city that puts passion at the top of its list. Much like New Yorkers and Angelinos, Londoners and Mancunians, Habaneros and Santiguans enjoy an amical rivalry; if Havana is the sexy little sister, then Santiago is its more responsible older sibling. View less Like the rest of Cuba, Santiago has a timeworn, once-majestic feel; yet despite this it holds its head high and is considered the culture capital of Cuba. Rumour has it that Son – a precursor dance to Salsa – was born here, while the balcony in Parque Cespedes that Fidel Castro gave his victory speech from in 1959 is still intact. Castro’s ashes have been laid to rest in the city cemetery such was his love for the city. This part of the island is gloriously off the tourist path – such as it is – of Havana and offers a fascinating glimpse of authentic Cuba. Retaining its much loved vibrancy, Santiago de Cuba’s identity has been more shaped by its proximity to the Dominican Republic than to Havana.
Day 5 — Georgetown, Grand Cayman
Begin exploring the capital by strolling along the waterfront Harbour Drive to Elmslie Memorial United Church, named after the first Presbyterian missionary to serve in Cayman. Its vaulted ceiling, wooden arches, and sedate nave reflect the religious nature of island residents. In front of the court building, in the center of town, names of influential Caymanians are inscribed on the Wall of History, which commemorates the islands' quincentennial in 2003. Across the street is the Cayman Islands Legislative Assembly Building, next door to the 1919 Peace Memorial Building. In the middle of the financial district is the General Post Office, built in 1939. Let the kids pet the big blue iguana statues.
Day 6 — Cienfuegos
Cienfuegos, Cuba

Cienfuegos, Cuba

Cienfuegos (“hundred fires”) is the city of Cuba with an exceptional colonial flavour. The city was founded in the early 19th century by French colonists and has been called The Pearl of the South. Its second nickname has been Cuban Paris –it has its own Arc de Triomphe. UNESCO declared it a World Cultural Heritage Site in 2005 as the best example of the 19th century implementation of new ideas in modernity, hygiene and order in Latin American urban planning.
Day 7 — At Sea
Cienfuegos (“hundred fires”) is the city of Cuba with an exceptional colonial flavour. The city was founded in the early 19th century by French colonists and has been called The Pearl of the South. Its second nickname has been Cuban Paris –it has its own Arc de Triomphe. UNESCO declared it a World Cultural Heritage Site in 2005 as the best example of the 19th century implementation of new ideas in modernity, hygiene and order in Latin American urban planning.
Day 8 to 9 — Havana
It was Hemmingway’s favourite haunt and it’s on every traveller’s bucket list, so let the shabby grandeur of Havana work its tender charms and fall in love with the rhythm and pulse of this city so long closed to mass tourism. Drink in the years of colonial history amid a colourful backdrop of emerging modernity, and be transported – both figuratively and literally if you count the fantastic 1950’s automobiles that mosey around waiting to pick up a tourist or two – by another era. Equal parts shabby, chic, timeworn and magnificence; Havana is a city that defies all definition. Full of charm, culture, a troubled past and promising future this is perhaps the Caribbean’s most interesting destination. Five decades of American embargo have made Havana, along with the rest of Cuba, an authenticity hunter’s dream. However, with the recent relaxation in entry laws, the times they are a-chaging, so now is the time to travel. The chequered history, socialist regime, revolution and cultural resurgence make the city centre something of a dichotomy; prosperity shines through in some neighbourhoods, while many areas still remain underdeveloped. But the famed unbreakable spirit still thrives and inequalities are being addressed, making Havana one of the most exciting destinations on the planet. In a nutshell, there are many reasons why you need to go to Havana. The warm, tropical weather. The bright freshness of a perfect mojito. The cultural smorgasbord that is the city centre. The friendly locals. The churches, cigar factories, artists' studios, museums, restaurants and UNESCO heritage sites ... Yet, there is one reason that stands head and shoulders above the rest on why you should visit Havana – it’s just so magical.
Day 10 — Bimini Island
The lovely little dual islands of Bimini consists of two main islands—North Bimini Island and South Bimini Island— as well as countless cays. Located just 50 miles off Florida’s coast, Bimini is the closest Bahamian island to the United States, and as such is the most “American” if all the Bahamian Islands. Yet, the miles and miles of pristine beaches are witness to the fact that yes, this is the Bahamas and yes, this is paradise indeed.
Day 11 — Fort Lauderdale, Florida
Like many southeast Florida neighbors, Fort Lauderdale has long been revitalizing. In a state where gaudy tourist zones often stand aloof from workaday downtowns, Fort Lauderdale exhibits consistency at both ends of the 2-mile Las Olas corridor. The sparkling look results from upgrades both downtown and on the beachfront. Matching the downtown's innovative arts district, cafés, and boutiques is an equally inventive beach area, with hotels, cafés, and shops facing an undeveloped shoreline, and new resort-style hotels replacing faded icons of yesteryear. Despite wariness of pretentious overdevelopment, city leaders have allowed a striking number of glittering high-rises. Nostalgic locals and frequent visitors fret over the diminishing vision of sailboats bobbing in waters near downtown; however, Fort Lauderdale remains the yachting capital of the world, and the water toys don’t seem to be going anywhere.

Sailing on Silver Wind

Silver Wind, the sister ship to Silver Cloud, embarked on its first voyage in 1995 and has recently been through a complete refurbishment, cementing its 6-star credentials.

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