Cruise offer

Includes flights, hotels, tours and save up to £500

Southern Caribbean Jewels

11 Day Cruise from £4,800 pp incl. flights  

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Silversea 11 Day Cruise on Silver Wind, Silversea from £4,800 pp incl. flights  

Departure 06 March 2020 | Southern Caribbean Jewels

Destinations

  • Fort Lauderdale
  • At Sea
  • San Juan
  • Gustavia
  • Saint John's
  • Little Bay
  • Great Harbour
  • At Sea
  • Fort Lauderdale

Southern Caribbean Jewels

from £4,800 pp incl. flights
Cruise offer
Includes flights, hotels, tours and save up to £500
  • Book by 31 Jan and enjoy included Economy Class Air return flights, hotel, transfers and shore excursions
  • Book by 28 February and enjoy up to £500 savings per suite
  • Upgrade to Business Class from £999 pp each way

Includes

  • Economy Class Return Flights
  • 1 night pre-hotel
  • Transfers (between airport, hotel and ship)
  • 1 Shore Excursion in every port
  • Spacious suites – over 80% with private verandas
  • Butler service in every suite
  • Unlimited Free Wifi
  • Personalised service – nearly one crew member for every guest
  • Multiple restaurants, diverse cuisine, open-seating dining
  • Beverages in-suite and throughout the ship, including champagne, select wines and spirits
  • 24-hour dining service
  • Onboard entertainment
  • Complimentary transportation into town in most ports
  • Onboard gratuities

The beauty of the Caribbean is that every island is different. Departing Florida’s sunny shores, settle down with two days at sea before discovery beckons in the shape of San Juan. St. Barts’ golden shores is next, during an overnight, followed by the music, history, culture and colour of St. John’s, Little Bay and Jost Van Dyke. Two more sea days to ensure complete R&R and your Caribbean dream is complete.

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Day by day itinerary

Day 1 — Fort Lauderdale, Florida
Like many southeast Florida neighbors, Fort Lauderdale has long been revitalizing. In a state where gaudy tourist zones often stand aloof from workaday downtowns, Fort Lauderdale exhibits consistency at both ends of the 2-mile Las Olas corridor. The sparkling look results from upgrades both downtown and on the beachfront. Matching the downtown's innovative arts district, cafés, and boutiques is an equally inventive beach area, with hotels, cafés, and shops facing an undeveloped shoreline, and new resort-style hotels replacing faded icons of yesteryear. Despite wariness of pretentious overdevelopment, city leaders have allowed a striking number of glittering high-rises. Nostalgic locals and frequent visitors fret over the diminishing vision of sailboats bobbing in waters near downtown; however, Fort Lauderdale remains the yachting capital of the world, and the water toys don’t seem to be going anywhere.
Day 2 to 3 — At Sea
Day 4 — San Juan
If you associate Puerto Rico's capital with the colonial streets of Old San Juan, then you know only part of the picture. San Juan is a major metropolis, radiating out from the bay on the Atlantic Ocean that was discovered by Juan Ponce de León. More than a third of the island's nearly 4 million citizens proudly call themselves sanjuaneros. The city may be rooted in the past, but it has its eye on the future. Locals go about their business surrounded by colonial architecture and towering modern structures.By 1508 the explorer Juan Ponce de León had established a colony in an area now known as Caparra, southeast of present-day San Juan. He later moved the settlement north to a more hospitable peninsular location. In 1521, after he became the first colonial governor, Ponce de León switched the name of the island—which was then called San Juan Bautista in honor of St. John the Baptist—with that of the settlement of Puerto Rico ("rich port").Defended by the imposing Castillo San Felipe del Morro (El Morro) and Castillo San Cristóbal, Puerto Rico's administrative and population center remained firmly in Spain's hands until 1898, when it came under U.S. control after the Spanish-American War. Centuries of Spanish rule left an indelible imprint on the city, particularly in the walled area now known as Old San Juan. The area is filled with cobblestone streets and brightly painted, colonial-era structures, and its fortifications have been designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site.Old San Juan is a monument to the past, but most of the rest of the city is planted firmly in the 21st century and draws migrants island-wide and from farther afield to jobs in its businesses and industries. The city captivates residents and visitors alike with its vibrant lifestyle as well as its balmy beaches, pulsing nightclubs, globe-spanning restaurants, and world-class museums. Once you set foot in this city, you may never want to leave.
Day 5 — Gustavia
Gustavia Harbor, St. Barths, French West Indies

Gustavia Harbor, St. Barths, French West Indies

You can easily explore all of Gustavia during a two-hour stroll. Some shops close from noon to 3 or 4, so plan lunch accordingly, but stores stay open past 7 in the evening. Parking in Gustavia is a challenge, especially during vacation times. A good spot to park is rue de la République, alongside the catamarans, yachts, and sailboats.
Day 6 — Saint John's
With its superb beaches, historical attractions and beautiful coral reefs, Antigua provides a host of diversions. It is said that the island contains 365 beaches, one for every day of the year. Antigua maintains its traditional West Indian character, with gingerbread-house style architecture, calypso music and carnival festivities. St John’s has been the administrative capital since the island’s colonisation in 1632, and has been the seat of government since it gained independence in 1981. From the port you can explore the colourful Redcliffe district, with its restored wooden houses, and Heritage Quay with its shopping mall and craft shops. The city has some fine examples of Colonial architecture, including the twin-towered cathedral, built in 1845 and considered one of the finest church buildings in the Caribbean. All coaches in Antigua are operated by smaller vehicles, and commentary will be given by a driver/guide.
Day 7 — Little Bay
Day 8 — Great Harbour, Jost Van Dyke
Jost Van Dyke, four miles long, is truly known as the 'barefoot island'. The smallest of the British Virgin Islands, it is known as a popular destination for yachts and is celebrated for its casual lifestyle, protected anchorages, fine beaches and beachfront restaurants and bars. The island has fewer than 200 inhabitants and they are widely known as a welcoming people. The island's name conjures up its rich, colorful past. Jost Van Dyke is said to have been named for an early Dutch settler, a former pirate. At Great Harbour, Little Harbour, and White Bay there are safe, protected bays and pristine beaches shaded with coconut palms and seagrape trees. Discover inviting shops selling local treasures, restaurants, and bars. 'The Painkiller', one of the Caribbean’s most popular drinks, originated at the Soggy Dollar Bar. Foxy’s and Gertrude's in White Bay are renowned for drinks made with the island's famous rum, frosty beers, and tales of pirates and sunken treasure. Explore Jost Van Dyke's history in the vegetation-covered ruins of centuries-old sugar mills, or on the old trails that crisscross the island. Revel in the natural beauty of the pristine, untouched beaches. Hike up to the highest spot on the island, Majohnny Point, and take in a stunning 360 degree view of the Caribbean. Relax in the natural 'bubble pool', a popular tourist attraction. Jost Van Dyke conjures up images of what the British Virgin Islands may have looked like many years ago.
Day 9 to 10 — At Sea
Day 11 — Fort Lauderdale, Florida
Like many southeast Florida neighbors, Fort Lauderdale has long been revitalizing. In a state where gaudy tourist zones often stand aloof from workaday downtowns, Fort Lauderdale exhibits consistency at both ends of the 2-mile Las Olas corridor. The sparkling look results from upgrades both downtown and on the beachfront. Matching the downtown's innovative arts district, cafés, and boutiques is an equally inventive beach area, with hotels, cafés, and shops facing an undeveloped shoreline, and new resort-style hotels replacing faded icons of yesteryear. Despite wariness of pretentious overdevelopment, city leaders have allowed a striking number of glittering high-rises. Nostalgic locals and frequent visitors fret over the diminishing vision of sailboats bobbing in waters near downtown; however, Fort Lauderdale remains the yachting capital of the world, and the water toys don’t seem to be going anywhere.

Sailing on Silver Wind

Silver Wind, the sister ship to Silver Cloud, embarked on its first voyage in 1995 and has recently been through a complete refurbishment, cementing its 6-star credentials.

See more about Silver Wind

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All of our cruise specialists are also global travel experts. They'll happily draw from their years of experience to combine your cruise with any number of pre- and post-cruise holiday options, creating a trip designed for you.

Included as standard...

  • 1 year complimentary Priority Pass membership
  • Complimentary airport lounge access *
  • Welcome Home Gift

* fly-cruise only

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020 7838 5991