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Darwin to Apra

20 Day Cruise from £10,980 pp  

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Silversea Expeditions 20 Day Cruise on Silver Explorer, Silversea Expeditions from £10,980 pp  

Departure 21 March 2021 | Darwin to Apra

Fares are cruise-only unless otherwise stated. Contact us to add flights and tailor-make your holiday.

Destinations

  • Darwin
  • At Sea
  • Matakus Island
  • At Sea
  • Agats
  • Triton Bay
  • At Sea
  • Pulau Amsterdam
  • Auri Islands
  • Kwatisore
  • Pudaidori Island
  • At Sea
  • Colonia
  • Sorol Atoll
  • Woleai Atoll
  • Lamotrek Atoll
  • Gaferut Atoll
  • Apra (Agana)

Darwin to Apra

from £10,980 pp
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Day by day itinerary

Day 1 — Darwin, Northern Territory
Waterfalls, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia

Waterfalls, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia

Darwin is Australia's most colorful, and exotic, capital city. Surrounded on three sides by the turquoise waters of the Timor Sea, the streets are lined with tropical flowers and trees. Warm and dry in winter, hot and steamy in summer, it's a relaxed and casual place, as well as a beguiling blend of tropical frontier outpost and Outback hardiness. Thanks to its close proximity to Southeast Asia and its multicultural population it also seems more like Asia than the rest of Australia. Darwin is a city that has always had to fight for its survival. The seductiveness of contemporary Darwin lifestyles belies a history of failed attempts that date from 1824 when Europeans attempted to establish an enclave in this harsh, unyielding climate. The original 1869 settlement, called Palmerston, was built on a parcel of mangrove wetlands and scrub forest that had changed little in 15 million years. It was not until 1911, after it had already weathered the disastrous cyclones of 1878, 1882, and 1897, that the town was named after the scientist who had visited Australia's shores aboard the Beagle in 1839. During World War II it was bombed more than 60 times, as the harbor full of warships was a prime target for the Japanese war planes. Then, on the night of Christmas Eve 1974, the city was almost completely destroyed by Cyclone Tracy, Australia’s greatest natural disaster. It's a tribute to those who stayed and to those who have come to live here after Tracy that the rebuilt city now thrives as an administrative and commercial center for northern Australia. Old Darwin has been replaced by something of an edifice complex—such buildings as Parliament House and the Supreme Court all seem very grand for such a small city, especially one that prides itself on its casual, outdoor-centric lifestyle. Today Darwin is the best place from which to explore Australia's Top End, with its wonders of Kakadu and the Kimberley region.
Day 2 — At Sea
Day 3 — Matakus Island
Matakus is a small island and part of the Tanimbar archipelago, located in Indonesia between Papua New Guinea and the northern coast of Australia. Matakus is just over two miles in length and less than a mile across. Despite its small size, its proximity to the regional capital city of Saumlaki just to the north ensures that the island is inhabited. The island is surrounded by fine, white-sand beaches and is a marine paradise, with fields of staghorn coral and schools of cardinalfish visible in its crystal clear waters.
Day 4 — At Sea
Day 5 to 6 — Agats
Day 7 — Triton Bay
In 2008, the Kaimana Regency declared a 6000 square kilometer (over 2,300 square mile) Marine Protected Area around the waters of Triton Bay. Conservation International maintains an office in Kaimana and a field station out in Triton Bay where visiting scientists can do their work studying the staggering marine biodiversity of the reserve. It is truly second to none, and the area offers everything from the tiniest pygmy seahorses, to large and graceful whale sharks. Triton Bay is known for its beautiful soft coral gardens as well as nesting green turtles, and a population of coastal Bryde’s whales.
Day 8 — At Sea
Day 9 — Pulau Amsterdam
Day 10 — Auri Islands
Day 11 — Kwatisore
Day 12 — Pudaidori Island
Day 13 to 14 — At Sea
Day 15 — Colonia, Yap
Day 16 — Sorol Atoll
Day 17 — Woleai Atoll
Day 18 — Lamotrek Atoll
Lamotrek is a coral atoll in the Federated States of Micronesia, and one of the fourteen outlying atolls that partly makeup the island State of Yap. While the total land area is less than half a square mile, it encloses a reef that is 12 square miles in size. The atolls are considered somewhat separate from Yap proper, which is made up of three contiguous islands set higher along the Philippine Sea Plate. The population of Lamotrek is approximately 373, and the residents are accustomed to visitors but still maintain their own culture proudly. Visitors to this small island will be greeted with generosity and friendliness that makes up the essence of the Yapese culture.
Day 19 — Gaferut Atoll
Gaferut Atoll is a rookery island full of nesting birds, and one of the fourteen outlying atolls that partly make up the island State of Yap in the Federated States of Micronesia. Just 1,500 feet long and 500 feet wide, Gaferut is called Fayo by the Fareulep people of the neighboring atolls; meaning stone or rock in the Woleaian language. The atolls are considered somewhat separate from Yap proper, which is made up of three contiguous islands set higher along the Philippine Sea Plate. Gaferut and its peer atolls are southeast of a nearly 1-mile reef that teems with beautiful undersea life amidst the clear turquoise waters.
Day 20 — Apra (Agana)
Guam is blessed with spectacular natural beauty and a rich cultural history. Apra Harbor is a deep-water port located on the western side of the island near the Mariana Islands and the Mariana Trench, which is the deepest part of the earth’s oceans, and the deepest location of the earth itself. The port serves both as a U.S. naval station and Guam’s main commercial port. The harbour, formed by the Orote Peninsula to the south and Cabras Island in the north, is considered to be one of the best natural ports in the Pacific. Guam’s unique culture, traditions and heritage have remained intact despite European imperialism, wars and changing foreign governments. Archaeological evidence suggests that the indigenous Chamorros of Indo-Malayan descent migrated from the Southeast Asian islands and settled throughout the Marianas archipelago. Being expert seamen and skilled craftsmen, they flourished and built unique houses and canoes suited to the region. As a matriarchal society and through the prestige of the women, much of the Chamorro culture and traditions were able to survive. Since the 16th century, a wave of foreigners have arrived on Guam’s shores, including Ferdinand Magellan in 1521 who remained on the island for three days to restock his small convoy. Americans, Asians, Europeans, Micronesians and other visitors have since left their imprint on the island’s pastimes and tastes.

Sailing on Silver Explorer

Silver Explorer formerly known as Prince Albert II has an ice-strengthened hull for expeditions into polar waters and the most remote destinations. Yet onboard guests are treated to an unmatched  atmosphere.

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All of our cruise specialists are also global travel experts. They'll happily draw from their years of experience to combine your cruise with any number of pre- and post-cruise holiday options, creating a trip designed for you.

Included as standard...

  • 1 year complimentary Priority Pass membership
  • Complimentary airport lounge access *
  • Welcome Home Gift

* fly-cruise only

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